OK Kanmani (aka) OK Bangaram

OK Kanmani (aka) OK Bangaram

Starring: Dulquer Salmaan, Nithya Menen
Director: Mani Ratnam
Director of Photography: P C Sreeram
Music Director: A R Rahman
Lyricist: Vairamuthu
Editor: Sreekar Prasad
Production Designer: Sharmishta Roy
Producer: Mani Ratnam
Executive Producer: Mala Manyan
Associate Producer: R. Krishnan
Choreographer: Brinda
Costume Designer: Eka Lakhani
Publicity Designer: Gopi Prasannaa
Stills: C.H.Balu
Studio: Madras Talkies
Distributed by : Studio Green(Tamil), Sri Venkateswara Creations (Telugu)

 

Slightly striking some similarities of his very own film ‘Alaipayuthey’, the film ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’ had its way of grabbing everyone’s interests. Sometimes for grandiloquence and some rare context of theme called ‘Live-in relationship’. Manirathnam’s O Kadhal Kanmani traces through the lives of two youngsters who strongly want to break the stereotypical pattern of leading a life.

Aadhi (Dulquer Salman) and Tara (Nithya Menen) have immersed in their own world of dreams and aspirations. Aadhi is a top-notch video game developer and Tara is a wannabe winner in the world of architecture. Their lives get interwoven for sharing same beliefs and they decide to have a Live-in relationship until they depart from the city of Mumbai to pursue their own dreams across the world. How long will they proceed with this new addition of Live-in?

When it’s a Maniratnam film, we are easily commuted to a different world, where even the most familiar superstars or actors would be seen in new dimensions. So is Dulquer Salman and Nithya Menen who in spite of having shared screens couple of times in ‘Ustad Hotel’ and ‘100 Days of Love’ look so fresh and appealing. There is nothing much particular you could pick from their performances, but they look finely exquisite. Prakash Raj and Leela Samson turn to be the major pillars of this film and their screen presence adds or in precise words, enlivens the film. Thanks to Maniratnam for this unusual casting that stands out as the great asset.

Deliberately emblazoning the film are the brilliant musical score of AR Rahman and saliently striking visuals by P.C. Sreeram. These two magicians throw abundant Midas-touch to the entire film. Incisively, Maniratnam has sketched every scene with exceptional uniqueness and the entire first half could have turned to be simply a mediocre without these technicians. AR Rahman’s background score blending western beats with Carnatic vocals is extraordinary.

The film’s one line is based on simple theme, where the youngsters striving to break the barriers of tradition called ‘Marriage’ gets enlightened looking into the lives of elderly couple. Maniratnam has beautifully conveyed the message that ‘Love’ and ‘Marriage’ are not tradition as many ‘Live-in’ groups perceive, but end of the day, everything is an emotion.

On the flip side, there aren’t any fresh scenes in the movie and most of them look slightly hackneyed.  What brings more emotion to the film is penultimate sequence to climax, where the couple realize that marriage is not about getting confined to the walls of old-age tradition.

Nevertheless, as you wind up with the show, we are questioned if ‘Live-in Relationship’ is a must to express this thought. Even a married couple who are on the verge of parting ways or someone in love who are finally calling off the relationship are enlightened by the experience could have added more sense.

 

Verdict: Well packaged breezy rom-com

 

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