Anjala

Anjala

Tea stalls have almost become the iconic emblems of Indian country, especially towards the down south territories of Tamil Nadu. Every tea stall records the lives of unique individuals and stories and that’s how Anjala is themed upon. The film is directed by Thangam Saravanan and is produced by action choreographer Dhilip Subbarayan with Auraa Cinemas releasing it.

The film traverses through the episodes of Anjala Tea stall, which is owned b Pasupathy. During the narration, we get to see that his very own grandfather (again played by Pasupathy), who was the main reason behind the origin of town during the pre-independence period with his little hub of refreshing the passerby people down there. Now with the contemporary times, we get to see that Vimal and his friends are having a great time out there. He falls in love with Nandita, who gets at the Anjala bus stop and there are lots of characters having a close connection with the tea stall. The film travels through the ups and down that the tea shop faces.

Vimal, Nandita and Pasupathy – All these three actors have something in commonality and that’s their exertion of naturalistic performance towards any roles they essay. They’re pretty rare ones, who could easily deliver a promising show with more elegance irrespective of their characterisations. Especially, when it comes to rural based movies, Pasupathy, Vimal and Nandita make their best spell and this one isn’t an exception. Thangam Saravanan has tried to register some lively moments in the film during the first half and on the flip side, the second hour has some sluggish incidents, which lowers down the momentum. But somehow, it will not be felt amongst the village side audiences.

On the technical front, cinematography deserves special mention for the tone and colours used. Musical score by Gopi Sundar doesn’t fit into the nativity of this movie. Not to blame the reigning music director of Malayalam industry, but his background score and song composing for Tamil rural nativity doesn’t befittingly get well. The flashback sequences are very well shot and the entire technical team deserves special mention along with Pasupathy.

On the whole, Anjala will be surely a decent show across the down south territories as there could be emotional connect with the movie. The audiences who don’t rely on reviews and critical analysis would definitely love it and when it comes to Multiplex theatres, there wouldn’t top opening, but might get well with the viral publicity.

Verdict: Emotional in few places, but screenplay could have been better

Bangalore Naatkal

Bangalore Naatkal

Bangalore Days had swept everyone off the feet with its beautiful treatment of script, characterisations, screen presence of prominent actors and entertainment packages. The original version directed by Anjali Menon starring Dulquer Salman, Nivin Pauly, Parvathy, Nazriya Nazim, Isha Talwar and Nithya Menon in lead roles. The remake version brings Arya, Rana Daggubati, Parvathy, Bobby Simha, Sri Divya, Samantha and Rai Laxmi in lead roles. The remake version comes from moviemaker Bommarillu Bhaskar and is produced by PVP Cinemas.

The film is about 3 cousins – Arya, Sri Divya and Bobby Simha, who have been carrying a beautiful dream of putting up in Bangalore from their childhood. Coincidentally, as they grow up, they have their reasons of getting into the city as Sri Divya enters wedlock with Rana Daggubati, Arya finds a job down there as a mechanic at racing club and Bobby Simha as a software engineer at top software company. The complete film is about their own episodes happening there, finding love and getting closer to each other.

It’s a vivid analysis for this film as there is a pretty good large bunch of actors. Everyone has their equal portion extended out with equal prominence. Arya has been sketched as a stubborn guy, who doesn’t believe in firmness of life. He goes as a nomadic way and doesn’t want to settle anywhere. Sri Divya as an innocuous girl gets to make a decent spell. Bobby Simha on his part gets to perform a hilarious role after long time and manages to steal the show. Rana Daggubati maintains the impact what is required for the role. Samantha appears only in the flashback and manages to have their realms too. Parvathy is the greatest showstopper, where she pulls of an excellent performance. Raai Laxmi doesn’t get a good scope. Prakash Raj is perfect. Saranya Ponvannan is quite naturalistic and hilarious in her role.

On the technical front, background score by Gopi Sundar enlivens the script in many places .The emotional contexts are very well elevated through his BGM. Cinematography by Guhan is top-notch and editing has been neatly done.

The first half proceeds with lively projection and by the second hour, the momentum slightly drops and duration seems to be little lengthy.

Bangalore Naatkal is a film tailor made for the multiplex audiences and it might not be a favourite cup of coffee for the audiences across rural and sub-urban. But again, when it comes to multiplex audiences, everyone has seen the original version with the subtitles and this could be a slight hampering mode for the remake.

Verdict: Sangfroid entertainer with lengthy second half

 

Visaranai

Visaranai

Engraving an impactful drama with raw and rough dramatic narration, Visaranai glimpses into the real life inspirations authored in the novel ‘Lock Up’, penned by Auto Chandran.

The film picks some of the intriguing episodes in the auto driver’s life and has fictionally pictured with creative writing. Filmmaker Vetrimaaran has been always carried a strong profound affinity for some unconventional movies, which was so much evident with National award winning film ‘Aadukalam’ and his production ventures with Dhanush in the past including ‘Kaaka Muttai’.

The film’s drama involves a bunch of youngsters, who have left Tamil Nadu to Andhra Pradesh for their livelihood. In terms of commercial elements, there are few romantic episodes involving Attakathi Dinesh and Kayal fame Anandhi, which has been included as a flashback, not upsetting or hampering the screenplay anywhere.

The first half has been crafted with an intensity of seriousness. We aren’t moved anywhere with our attention away from the screens….. Although the running length of the complete show is limited of approximately lesser than couple of hours, but we are taken through a course of lots of dramatic moments, which are quite engrossing. In fact, there are rarity in films, where while reviewing or analysing, you speak about everything including the technical and narrative details, but not anything on the plot. Because the film ‘Visaranai’ has such a brilliance of reality sketched up in every sequence. The last 20 minutes of this film it gives an experience that you almost gained in Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto.

Getting on with the performance, Attakathi Dinesh has simply lived into the role that has been offered to him. He is someone, who could easily give a decent stroke through his performance in roles that was embedded with innocence. Kayal Anandhi doesn’t get more scope, but is on her best in portions offered to her. The ultimate showstoppers are Kishore and Samuthirakani. These versatile actors have their own realms spread out. Especially the performance of Samuthirakani in the second half deserves so much of appreciations.

Just as Yuvan Shankar Raja had created a massive attempt with background score in Aaranya Kaandam, GV Prakash too makes an impressive show here. The film has no songs, but it could eventually make up for the best on background score in enhancing the screenplay.

Verdict: Surpassing drama of bitter reality and strong performances

Aranmanai 2

Aranmanai 2

Directed by : Sundar C.
Produced by : Kushboo
Written by : Venkat Raghavan, Sundar C.
Screenplay by : Sundar.C, S.B.Ramadoss
Starring : Sundar.C, Siddharth, Trisha, Hansika Motwani, Poonam Bajwa, Soori
Music by : Hiphop Tamizha
Cinematography : U. K. Senthil Kumar
Edited by : N. B. Srikanth
Production company : Avni Cinemax
Distributed by : Sri Thenandal Films
Release dates : 29 January 2016
Country : India
Language : Tamil

First and foremost, you could raise your hands for applauding the earnest works of CG experts and set decorators. Their work is predominately prevalent throughout the film or else, Aranmanai 2 would be nothing but a boring experience loaded with same old plot of previous version with inclusion of some additional star-cast like Trisha and Poonam Bajwa, who are intentionally used for their skin shows, especially the former one. Siddarth looks pale and deplorable throughout the film, where he doesn’t get to speak or perform anywhere stronger. He is almost like a typical hero we find in usual ‘Amman’ movies, where the male protagonist would be dumb and silent, but the ladies would rule the show.

Sundar C has lifted the high profile sequences from various Hollywood movies and yes, this time, he has picked few from the horror tale pages of Twitter too… That’s a good development Sundar C! But we aren’t able to digest the same stereotypical stories repeated over and again.

There is nothing special to mention about the plot and yes it involves a family in ‘Aranmanai’ haunted by paranormal experiences with few mysterious deaths. Yes, we see a ghost behind this drama and it has a revenge to settle.

Sundar C has clearly understood the mentality of audiences who prefer watching his movies and has exactly gratified them. Lots of skin shows, comedy sequences and rarely seen horror sequences is sure to keep the rural audiences.

The open ending with the ‘The Doll’ walking into the Aranmanai is a prompt for ‘Aranmanai 3’. Yes, with such cohort of audiences who are still ready to keep themselves satisfied watching the oomph factors and silly horror elements, Sundar C and producers can even invest additional budget into such movies.

Verdict: Nothing different ‘Aranmanai’, but with some modifications.

Irudhi Suttru

Irudhi Suttru

Directed by : Sudha Kongara
Produced by : S. Sashikanth, C. V. Kumar (Tamil), R. Madhavan (Hindi), Rajkumar Hirani (Hindi)
Written by : Sudha Kongara Prasad, Sunanda Raghunathan, Arun Matheshwaran (Tamil dialogues)
Starring : R. Madhavan, Ritika Singh
Music by : Santhosh Narayanan
Cinematography : Sivakumar Vijayan
Edited by : Sathish Suriya
Production company : Y NOT Studios, UTV Motion Pictures, Thirukumaran Entertainment (Tamil)
Distributed by : Dream Factory (Tamil), Rajkumar Hirani Films, Tricolour Films (Hindi)
Release dates : 29 January 2016
Country : India
Language Tamil, Hindi

A coach and his protégé travelling through the hardships to conquer the dreams that world would look upon. A nitty-gritty tale that takes you through an emotional course of more dramatic episodes narrated with crispness and brilliant technical aspects. Filmmaker Sudha Kongra’s maiden debut ‘Drohi’ might have not been everyone’s favourite cup of coffee, but it had some efficiency in the making style. Taking a long phase, perhaps a pregnant pause for years, she bounces back with an impeccable tale of ‘Irudhi Suttru’ that offers inspiringly propelling encounters.

Madhavan plays a retired boxer, who is urged by situations to give up his dream career. Off the late, his venture as a coach too gets in risky stake. He moves down to Chennai and there comes across a compelling amateur boxer (Ritika Singh), who proves to be a worthy of becoming the Nation’s pride. Nevertheless, the duo has its own toast of affection and combats involved during this venture of turning the public glare on.

One thing that keeps you so much adhered to the film is its treatment of screenplay rendered by Sudha Kongra. The stark characterisations that aren’t confined to certain qualifications, but that can instantly make you laugh and bind you emotionally too…. For instance, we have the characters played by Nasser, Radharavi, Kaali Venkat and few others evoking the right humour in situational contexts rather than placing a namesake comedian. Madhavan extols with a flawless spell and it’s almost like he waited for this script for years and yes he delivers a compelling show. Watch out for the sequence, where he is humiliated by Ritika saying, “Manasula Enna Dhanush nu nenaipa?” (Do you think yourself Dhanush?). No actor would easily accept such lines and Maddy deserves huge appreciations for this factor. Ritika doesn’t look like a newcomer and she pulls forth a magnetizing performance. She easily delivers so much of naturalistic approach towards her characterisation. The last 30 minutes of the film, the duo Madhavan-Ritika just sweep us off the feet. Radha Ravi and Nasser on their portions deliver more realistic show. There are many sequences, where the raw rustic profane lines are used, but they look apt for the situations.

On the technical front, the musical score by Santosh Narayanan offers the sumptuous treat with transfixing background score and songs. He is indeed one of the strong pillars for making the film look more enhanced. Cinematography and editing are the backbones perhaps, especially during the last 15 minutes.

Overall, Irudhi Suttru deserves a must watch cadre and yes, it has everything that will inspire you, engage you and moreover offer a great message of honouring and encouraging women to achieve best things to bring pride in our country.

Verdict: A persuasive drama of inspirations and emotions

Tharai Thappattai

Tharai Thappattai

Bala is definitely a genius filmmaker and criticizing his films could perhaps land the analysts into a zone of ‘Not matured enough to mark verdicts’. But to make a precise mark, the film Thaara Thappattai lacks a proper storyline and doesn’t hold us intact anywhere. The filmmaker usually gives a depth exploration of whatever he handles in concept, but this time, things go vague and directionless by the first few minutes of this film. It all starts with a promising note, where we find the documentary filmmakers capturing the best folk arts group performance. That’s a fantabulous dimension, where we find Varalaxmi boozing up before performance and giving the best spell out there. The scenarios persist with good dimension, but lose the way out by the middle of this film. It’s so disappointing to see, the story losing the impact and brilliant performances of actors going in vain.

Say for instances, the sequences we find about the dancers in Andaman Island is remarkable and especially not to miss the spellbinding performance of Varalaxmi Sarathkumar. Yes, as she says in the trailer, ‘Naan Hero, Mama Heroine’ with a hilarious touch, she proves to be the main protagonist in this film, where she spells the best brownie points and Sasikumar not getting much to perform until the climax, where he apes the usual style of protagonists in Bala movie. Studio 9 producer Sasikumar deliberately makes an impressive performance towards the show and he is simply casual in terrorizing with his acting.

Ilayaraja offers the best support to this film, where his background score is prodigious and beyond his usual paradigms. His orchestral works in the background score is matchless and he yet again proves his wizardry in 1000th film.

Getting on with the narrative analysis, the screenplay goes feeble, but there is no connectivity between one scene to the other. There is so much discontinuity, where Bala blindly throws up lot of harsh sounds through slaps, beatings and combat. It looks like Bala had felt that he could grab the audiences’ attention by these tactics.

Overall, Thaara Thappattai belongs to Varalaxmi Sarathkumar, where she can easily walk away with lots of awards, but when it comes to Bala, it’s a mere disappointment as the film doesn’t completely deal with the essence of Thaara Thappattai folk art. What is supposed to be a musical genre, fails to survive because of poor screenplay and unbearable violence.


Verdict: Powerful performance but heavy loaded with gory sequence

Rating: 3/5

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